Pope Francis Elected, Mystery of Iniquity Moves On

Papa Francis I

By Richard Bennett

As Pope Francis moves onto the world stage, many people are wondering how he will be generally accepted. The pleasant aura of John Paul II still lingers for many, while the shortcomings of Benedict XVI still color the current scene. More importantly, given the Pope’s exalted position in the world, many will be asking how this new Pope will change the Papacy. The fact remains, however, that since the early 19th century the Office of the Papacy has been set on a course of action that no individual pope will reverse. How can this be so?

The International Eucharistic Congress 2012 Is this a Christian event?

by Richard Bennett

A major news item across the Catholic world for the summer of 2012 is that the International Eucharistic Congress (IEC) is to be held in Dublin, Ireland from June 10th – 17th. The Congress is expected to attract 25,000 people a day, including “12,000 international pilgrims representing 99 different countries.” Just what is a Eucharistic Congress? A Catholic source replies,

“It is a gathering of Catholics – priests, religious and laity who come together to express their devotion for the Holy Eucharist…The International Congresses are usually 3-5 years apart, which allows for preparation, as they are always held worldwide. Catholics come from all over the world to participate in the ceremonies and to celebrate Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. …All believers – clergy, religious and laity line the streets following the Blessed Sacrament.

Are Catholics Christians?

By Richard Bennett

The Catholic Church presupposes itself to be Christian. Nothing could be further from the truth; yet, the Catholic Church has been ardently promoting that image, particularly since the close of Vatican Council II in 1965. A primary, non-negotiable goal of Vatican Council II was to lay the groundwork and to establish the rules and parameters for a multifaceted, ecumenical outreach. Evangelical Christians, now called “separated brethren,” rather than “heretics,” 1 are the primary target of Catholic ecumenism. The goal is to draw them into the Roman Catholic fold.2 Thus, in the 1994 Catechism of the Catholic Church, the word “Christian” occurs more than 100 times in these official teachings. Buzzwords such as “dialogue,” “ecumenism,” and “social justice” are being used under the guise of promoting Christianity to advance the Roman Catholic agenda.